Look at me!

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Look at me!

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Entitlement

Arriving in his home town
Jesus entered the coming-together place
and addressed his people.
A wave of amazement washed over them,
and then receded almost as quickly.

No special favours, he told them.
Like it was with Elijah and Elisha,
it won’t be the local people who receive the words,
or the blessings.
It’ll be the outsiders, the strangers,
the foreigners and other no-hopers.

Hardly surprising, then,
that a new wave was generated;
one of anger and outrage.
This one took its time passing,
as the throng rode it malevolently
to the cliff at edge of the town;
sweeping the offender before them.

There, to their credit,
they had second thoughts,
and let him walk away.
Which proved to be a good thing
for us outsiders, strangers,
foreigners and other no-hopers.

 

© Ken Rookes 2016

Haiku sequence: He stood up to read.

In Nazareth town
an ancient text is opened,
intriguing words read.

Isaiah’s promise
of good news, hope and freedom,
is spoken once more.

The parchment is rolled,
returned to the attendant;
the man sits back down.

Eyes are fixed on him.
They watch his moves, and listen;
what will he do next?

Touched by the Spirit ,
the carpenter-man proclaims:
the day has arrived.

The synagogue gasps
at his bold declaration
and foundations shake.

Jesus, local boy,
who do you think that you are
to make such a claim?

© Ken Rookes 2016

When the wine gave out

Those things that have grown weary
and no longer serve their purpose,
are to be cast aside;
their place will be taken
by the eager and determined.

The caterers’ miscalculations
threaten to bring the nuptial celebrations
to a premature conclusion.
Water’s cold austerity
gives way to wine by the bucketful;
joy flows abundant and free,
and the party continues.
The attendant throng is suitably amazed;
the man’s mother, who provoked the action,
is merely impressed.

In the hands of her son
the wedding feast is made into
the metaphor par excellence:
life that is fruitful and expectant,
filled with hope, joy,
and laden with possibility.

 

© Ken Rookes 2016