Animal Farm

Over the Easter weekend I took part in the Bendigo Easter Festival Paint Out, where ten local artists were tasked with painting festival action. We were expected to paint for at least three hours on each of two days.

I accepted the challenge of moving beyond the proverbial comfort zone, and found it an enriching experience engaging with the public as I worked. Some children told me I was a good artist, despite evidence to the contrary in the early stages of the painting.

I produced this acrylic painting, entirely from life, of the children’s animal farm in Rosalind Park. I think it works quite well.

 

animal farm sm

 

 

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Proof

The previously-dead Jesus meets with Thomas
and invites his sceptical friend
to extend his hand,
to touch his master’s injured hands and side.
This, according to gospel-writer John,
is the incontrovertible proof
that his Lord lives.

We find it less convincing.
Nor do the various reported signs work for us
in quite the same way that they did for the evangelist.
two thousand years ago.
What evidence, then,
might persuade you and I that our master is alive?

The generous acts of his followers? Perhaps.
Loving deeds of disciples? Maybe.
Lives spent courageously for the sake of justice, hope,
and the gospel?
Yes,
such as these could be sufficient
to satisfy the rest of us sceptics.

 

©Ken Rookes 2016

 

 

 

A group of Easter haiku

Third day Haiku

It is the third day.
The Sabbath has concluded,
now we anoint him.

Empty tomb haiku

The tomb is empty.
Nothing will be found inside;
except mystery.

The women: Haiku

Returning, they spoke
of what they had heard and seen.
No one believed them.

Idle tale haiku

The women’s story:
not taken seriously
when they told the men.

Mary. A haiku.

Mary Magdalene;
witness to the empty tomb.
Can this mean he lives?.

 

© Ken Rookes 2016

Jesus before Herod: a haiku sequence

A king called Herod
looks down from his lofty throne;
he has the power.

He smiles, curious,
having heard rumours and tales;
wonders if they’re true.

He requests a sign;
but the man stands silently
and gives him nothing.

The monarch persists,
hearing the accusations,
asks: What do you say?

No words are spoken.
Jesus stands before the king,
waits for the next step.

Treated with contempt,
he is robed, mocked and dismissed.
Your problem, Pilate.

 

 

© Ken Rookes 2016.

 

In Bethany: a haiku sequence.

Dinner for Jesus
in Bethany with his friends.
the end approaches.

Martha is serving,
Lazarus sits with Jesus,
Mary is Mary.

Mary takes perfume,
pure nard, big and costly;
pours on Jesus’ feet.

Feet are wiped with hair;
the house is filled with fragrance,
devotion and tears.

Here, too, is outrage.
“A years wages are wasted;
what about the poor?”

The poor need our help,
and so much more. Loving acts
demonstrate love’s truth.

“My death approaches;
her anointing is timely.
Let her be,” he says.

Mary’s wasteful gift
is received with gratitude
by one who knows love.

 

© Ken Rookes 2016

Try clicking on the video Leave her alone on the bar above.

The poem Leave her alone is found here

It is actually Here