Dealing with dark forces.

haiku of ambivalence.

When light is coming
the dark forces congregate;
seeking to destroy.

A classic story.
The child of blessing, threatened,
survives the danger.

Like Moses, floating
on the river, the baby
lives to overcome.

Herod, the despot,
becomes his first enemy.
Will not be the last.

The angel returns
with a warning and advice:
Take the child and flee.

The land of bondage
becomes the place of refuge.
History reversed.

Back in Judea
the story is less pleasant.
Evil has triumphed.

The years pass, as does
the danger. The family
return to their land.

They choose Nazareth
in Galilee, to the north.
There they make their home.

 

© Ken Rookes 2016

Advertisements

He was in the beginning

Haiku of the coming

In the beginning.
They are indivisible,
the Logos and God.

Into the nothing
the Logos-God mystery
find their voice and speak.

The word, now spoken,
all creation comes to be.
Here is wonderment.

The Logos brings life;
life and light for humankind,
defeating darkness.

Logos, always there
in the world he created,
passes through, unseen.

Among his people
he finds no welcome nor home.
The loss is their own.

Yet some received him,
believed, and living by faith,
were made God’s children.

To be born of God,
transcending earthly limits;
this, then, is glory.

The Logos took flesh,
our flesh, and lived among us;
full of grace and truth.

 

© Ken Rookes 2016

A wondrous yarn

Haiku of an often told story.

 

There are no records
of the birth of the Messiah;
just an old story.

An anxious couple
seeking a place of shelter.
The time is at hand.

In a crowded town,
a stable, strangely, becomes
a delivery ward.

A baby is born,
this thing of joy and wonder.
Happens ev’ry day.

Shepherds tending sheep,
angels winging in the sky;
a fabulous yarn.

Go and check it out!
The baby in a manger,
with his mum and dad.

The infant is found;
it was as the angel said.
They are all amazed.

The shepherds return
singing, “Glory!” praising God,
They tell everyone.

 

© Ken Rookes 2016

Found to be with child

Haiku of mysterious birth

The birth of Jesus,
as befits a Messiah,
was less than routine.

Matthew’s birth stories
are designed to assure us:
things are in order.

Isaiah the prophet
provides a girl giving birth
as a sign of hope.

Found to be with child!
One way of looking at it;
the girl was pregnant.

With child, and engaged
to a man not the father.
It’s complicated.

Her husband, Joseph
is a good man. He still cares,
does not want her shamed.

Dreams can be useful
to spark possibilities
and provide answers.

The angel appears,
reassures the sleeping man:
somehow God is here.

Do not be afraid,
take the girl to be your wife;
the child is from God,

When the man awoke
he took the angel’s advice;
brought her to his home.

When the day arrived
the girl delivered her son.
They named him Jesus.

 

© Ken Rookes 2016

Magnificat: a haiku sequence

Haiku for a revolution

A young teenager,
so the ancient story says,
offered up a song.

The girl is with child;
this is a thing of wonder,
of hope and of joy.

Nobody special,
she is God’s lowly servant;
humble, accepting.

Magnifying God,
she sang with praise, rejoicing
at God’s strange favour.

Mercy unconfined,
across the generations,
for those who trust God.

God’s strength surprises
to scatter the great and proud
in their vanity.

From their noble thrones
the powerful are brought down.
Let the day come close.

The poor, down-trodden;
these will be elevated
to God’s chosen place.

The hungry will eat,
they will dine upon good food;
the rich will miss out.

From this young girl’s lips
came words of revolution.
Most disconcerting.

 

© Ken Rookes 2016

 

When John heard in prison

Haiku of enquiry

We missed you, Baptist;
your amusing desert rants
made us think again.

The authorities
were less amused; took offense,
waited for their chance.

If you’d stopped and thought
you might have backed off, instead
you’re locked in prison.

So you sent your mates
to find out what’s happening.
They seek out Jesus.

They ask: are you he,
the one we are expecting,
or do we still wait?

Open up your eyes,
what do you see, and hear
as you look about?

The blind see again,
lepers are being made clean,
the lame are walking.

And as for the poor,
they’re hearing the good news
with joy and with hope.

Go, tell the prophet
that God’s kingdom has come near.
Tell him: be at peace.

 

© Ken Rookes 2016