Keep yourself nice

Haiku for a polite and ordered world

Is righteous living
about keeping yourself nice?
Jesus says there’s more.

The holy people
observe the old tradition:
wash before you eat.

Always wash your hands
before you eat. Good practice,
enshrined in the law.

Other rules as well;
the washing of cups and pots
and kettles of bronze.

Pharisees object
to the careless disciples
and their defiled hands.

Isaiah knew it;
the faithless hypocrisy
behind your worship.

You care about rules
much more than you care about
what God is wanting.

It’s time to get real!
It’s the things you do and say
that make you defiled.

Always there is more
than the narrow, centred fears
of the self-righteous.

© Ken Rookes 2018

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Difficult words

Haiku of offence.

Eating and drinking,
taking my life deep within;
they abide in me,

They will always live,
nor will their deeds be forgot,
alive in God’s heart.

Difficult teachings,
who can accept them? Even
disciples struggle.

From the spirit comes
true life; the flesh is useless.
Believe in my words.

Many disciples
turned back. His words were too hard,
the way was too tough.

He questioned the twelve:
Do you also wish to leave,
is it all too hard?

Where else can we go?
said Peter. Your words are life;
you have come from God.

 

© Ken Rookes 2018

Living bread

Haiku of eternal life

I am living bread,
Jesus says in John’s gospel.
Eat, live for ever.

The leaders dispute.
How can this man give his flesh
that people might eat?

I tell you truly,
Jesus says, Life is in me,
take me deep within.

In these words we find
Eucharistic overtones:
Come to the table.

My flesh is true food,
and my blood is true drink: Take,
eat, and drink of me.

Who partake of me,
live in me; and I abide
in them. We are one.

The Father sent me.
The life I have is from God;
I share it with you.

The bread from heaven
gives life that is fair dinkum.
Come to me and eat.

 

© Ken Rookes 2018

The bread of life

Haiku for those who need to be fed

The Johanine Christ
calls himself the bread of life;
much consternation.

Is this not Jesus,
the son of the carpenter?
Claims to come from God!

The Father sent me,
and he draws many to me;
I will raise them up.

Learn from the Father
and come to me. I’ll show you
how to truly live.

Your ancestors ate
wilderness bread from above;
death still embraced them.

I am living bread.
Eat of me, receive my life;
you need never die.

Heaven’s living bread,
bread that gives life to the world:
this bread is my flesh.

 

© Ken Rookes 2018