The old people sing

Haiku of fulfillment

Old people hang out
in churches and in temples;
watching and waiting.

Something might happen.
You never know, it might be
the day God appears.

Righteous and devout,
old Simeon was patient;
he would see the Christ.

His words erupted!
This child, he would be the one;
light and salvation!

The old man blessed them.
It is enough, I’ve seen him
Let me go now, God.

He spoke to Mary.
There will arise much turmoil
on the road to peace.

Anna, the prophet,
saw the child, raised her old voice,
and joined in the song.

Wisdom and insight
come not just with the years,
but with openness.

 

© Ken Rookes 2017.

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Tales of wonder

Haiku of uncertain destination.

The tale is dodgy,
its historicity doubtful,
but still we wonder.

Driven by a dream
they seek the child of promise,
born to be a king.

They came from the east,
a vague description, at best;
those men of wisdom.

No maps, GPS,
their star takes them all the way
to Jerusalem.

They call on Herod;
(where else would you find a prince
but in a palace?)

Herod takes advice,
sends them off to Bethlehem;
asks to stay informed.

The child is threatened
by this late development.
God’s plans are at risk.

Finding the infant
they offer their gifts: the gold,
frankincense and myrrh.

The gifts are laden
with meaning and importance
for a future king.

Having paid homage,
the pilgrims return eastward,
give Herod a miss.

The nations have seen,
the threat will be overcome;
the story rolls on.

 

© Ken Rookes 2017

Dealing with dark forces.

haiku of ambivalence.

When light is coming
the dark forces congregate;
seeking to destroy.

A classic story.
The child of blessing, threatened,
survives the danger.

Like Moses, floating
on the river, the baby
lives to overcome.

Herod, the despot,
becomes his first enemy.
Will not be the last.

The angel returns
with a warning and advice:
Take the child and flee.

The land of bondage
becomes the place of refuge.
History reversed.

Back in Judea
the story is less pleasant.
Evil has triumphed.

The years pass, as does
the danger. The family
return to their land.

They choose Nazareth
in Galilee, to the north.
There they make their home.

 

© Ken Rookes 2016

A wondrous yarn

Haiku of an often told story.

 

There are no records
of the birth of the Messiah;
just an old story.

An anxious couple
seeking a place of shelter.
The time is at hand.

In a crowded town,
a stable, strangely, becomes
maternity ward.

A baby is born,
this thing of joy and wonder.
Happens ev’ry day.

Shepherds tending sheep,
angels winging in the sky;
a fabulous yarn.

Go and check it out!
The baby in a manger,
with his mum and dad.

The infant is found;
it was as the angel said.
They are all amazed.

The shepherds return
singing, “Glory!” praising God,
They tell ev’ryone.

 

© Ken Rookes 2016

Found to be with child

Haiku of mysterious birth

The birth of Jesus,
as befits a Messiah,
was less than routine.

Matthew’s birth stories
are designed to assure us:
things are in order.

Prophet Isaiah
provides a girl giving birth
as a sign of hope.

Found to be with child!
One way of looking at it;
the girl was pregnant.

With child, and engaged
to a man not the father.
It’s complicated.

Her husband, Joseph
is a good man. He still cares,
does not want her shamed.

Dreams can be useful
to spark possibilities
and provide answers.

The angel appears,
reassures the sleeping man:
somehow God is here.

Do not be afraid,
take the girl to be your wife;
the child is from God,

When the man awoke
he took the angel’s advice;
brought her to his home.

When the day arrived
the girl delivered her son.
They named him Jesus.

 

© Ken Rookes 2016

Nativity Haiku

Shepherds and angels
conversing in the shadows,
illumined by hope.

Good news pronouncement;
Great joy! The one sent from God
breathes earth’s air today.

Down in Bethlehem
while everyone sleeps; at last
something has happened!

No room at the inn;
so the man and the woman
had to improvise.

Why do you delay?
You should get yourselves moving
or you’ll miss the show.

Entrusting their sheep
to the angelic choir,
they went to find him.

A baby is born.
It happens every day;
what’s special this time?

This feed-box cradle
is offered as a sign. Strange,
but appropriate.

The shepherds returned,
sharing their wond’rous story;
couldn’t keep silent.

 

© Ken Rookes 2015

Blessed the fruit of your womb

The story begins with a girl,
fecund, mid-teens,
belly beginning to swell.
It will get much larger,
as, within her womb,
the miracle of life claims its space.

An unlikely sign, vulnerable,
yet outrageously defiant;
a sign to engender hope,
to confront earth’s bondage
and futility.

A peasant girl,
pregnant with purpose and possibility;
the lowly are to be elevated to positions of significance
while kings, emperors, princesses
and other persons of power and plenty
will be asked to descend from their lofty seats
to begin their acquaintance with earth’s dust.

The girl could be anyone;
any place on the planet,
any point in its history.
She is caught up in this common human tale;
the wonder,
the waiting,
the struggle,
the pain
and the joy.

A sign for eternity.

 

© Ken Rookes 2015