We stopped listening

Haiku for the respectable

We stopped listening
to Jesus some years ago.
His words were too hard.

We much prefer wealth
and power and influence.
We vote for Mammon.

We like the idea
of being known as Christians,
just not the method.

He said Love Neighbour
but failed to clearly define
the limits to love.

We believe in love.
We do our bit. The failure
must lie somewhere else.

We like the concept
of justice. We just don’t think
we should bear the cost.

One thing that he said:
The poor are always with you.
We agree with that.

Some people languish
behind gates and barbed wire.
Nought to do with us.

We do not much like
the idea of grace, unless
applied to ourselves.

We are deserving,
unlike the many who aren’t.
Jesus rewards us.

We are disciples,
following our Lord Jesus,
anchored to the ground.

 

© Ken Rookes 2018

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Let’s find a new date!

I posted this haiku a few years ago when we were living in the remote community of Willowra in Central Australia. To celebrate Australia Day on 26th January is deeply offensive to our indigenous sisters and brothers, for whom the date marks the invasion of their country. It’s a shame that the Prime Minister chooses not to understand this. Well, done, the City of Yarra!

Australia Day Haiku

Australia Day
here among the Warlpiri;
no-one notices.

© Ken Rookes 2015

None of these will lose their reward

Haiku for disciples

Welcoming others,
showing hospitality,
it’s what Jesus wants.

When you are welcomed,
Jesus is made welcome too,
and God who sent him.

As you show welcome
to the small and lowly ones
you are rewarded.

As you invite them
to come under your welcome,
so you will be blessed.

Cups of cold water
given to these little ones
won’t go unoticed.

Hospitality:
a forgotten eastern art,
much undervalued.

Generosity –
a function of the kingdom.
That, along with love.

© Ken Rookes 2017

Matthew’s Beatitudes

Haiku for malcontents.

The poor in spirit,
Matthew tells us, will be blessed;
God will be their king.

Those who weep and mourn
will receive divine comfort;
they will know God’s peace.

Fairly straight-forward,
so far, these beatitudes.
Most reassuring.

The meek, we are told
will inherit the earth. But
it’s hard to see how.

Those who are hungry
for righteousness and justice
will be filled. One day.

But if they dare act
against our wealth and power,
we will deal with them.

Those who show mercy
will be labelled ‘bleeding hearts.’
(I made that one up.)

Those who have pure hearts
will see God. We will dismiss
them, call them naive.

The makers of peace
are God’s children. They refuse
to abandon hope.

Their task is thankless.
Dismissed as fools, both their tears
and their smiles persist.

Blessed are the ones
who suffer for goodness’ sake;
God will embrace them.

They may, however,
receive no justice on earth.
should they be content?

What’s a blessing worth?
Whether real or imagined,
can it compensate?

 

© Ken Rookes 2017