Oz Day Haiku 2019

In this wide scorched land
fear settles red, a dust film
smothering justice.

Who chose this dark day
of dispossession and death
for celebration?

 

© Ken Rookes

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Haiku for a rapidly warming planet

(For the zealously religious, feel free to substitute the word “God” for “evolution,” but do so knowing that you destroy the haiku.)

 

Will evolution
simply pause, take a deep breath,
and begin again?

 

© Ken Rookes 2018

Unuttered expletives

When I was younger
and more polite,
my life was filled with unuttered expletives.
Prime Ministers and other hypocrite politicians,
fat-cat capitalists
and other corrupt leaders,
press barons and fascist commentators;
they all provided grounds
for my unspoken ire.

Sadly,
the occasions for outrage have multiplied
and the world of my grandchildren
appears destined for destruction.
Now, old, grumpy,
and unconcerned about causing offence,
I no longer have time
or space in my life
for the unuttered.

 

© Ken Rookes 2018

Will he find faith on earth?

The Almighty,
according to this parable,
interpreted by one, Jesus,
who is also called God’s son,
grants justice to those who seek it.
Whatever that means.
We could do with a bit more justice.
For refugees and asylum seekers,
women who are beaten,
children who are abused;
innocent victims
of air attacks,
lax gun laws,
racial bigotry, misogeny, and religious fear;
not to mention capitalism’s excesses,
corrupt politicians
and dishonest jurists.
Like the judge in the parable.

We who seek justice, this story declares,
are encouraged to cry out day and night
to the aforesaid Almighty.
I might quietly suggest
that such crying out,
railing against such a raft of injustices,
loudly, persistently and annoyingly,
might in fact be the inconvenient duty
of all who follow Jesus.

 

© Ken Rookes 2016

Haiku for the sixth of August (and one for the ninth)

Haiku for the sixth of August:

On Hiroshima
the fiery cloud descended,
burning day to night.

 

And one for the ninth:

As if the first one
brought insufficient sorrow;
Nagasaki, too.

 

© Ken Rookes 2015

I posted these for Hiroshima Day 2015, and thought I’d repost them for this year.