Even the wind and the sea

Haiku for the storm-tossed.

When evening came
they took the boat, crossed over
to the other side.

Left the crowd behind,
looking for a brief respite.
Other boats came too.

In the stern, weary,
on a cushion, tired eyes;
Jesus falls asleep.

The wind is rising,
grows into a roaring gale;
waves are crashing in.

Fearful, they wake him.
Teacher, are you not concerned?
We could all be drowned!

Rebuking the wind
and commanding wild sea
he speaks: Peace! Be Still!

The wind dies away
and the waves cease their crashing;
Why are you afraid?

Why are you afraid​?
We’ve travelled far together;
have you still no faith?

Who, they ask, is this;
the wind is at his command,
the sea obeys him.

Words for the faithful
when all seems out of control:
Be at peace! Be still!

 

© Ken Rookes 2018

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Peace! Be Still!


Without the benefit of radar rain mapping

or Doppler wind display,

Jesus, known among the faithful

as Son of the great Creator-Parent,

manages to deal with the storm.

First century gospel writers

had no hesitation in promoting

the miracle-working capacities of their Lord;

evidence, as it was, of his status as an equal

within the Godhead.

Hey, storm-subduing Jesus,

orderer of waves

and director of the wind,

we could use a few miracles, too!

How about sending some rain down here;

you know that we need it.

And while you’re at it

there are a few other storms

that could do with some divine intervention.

The blizzards of relationships, frozen,

bitter and unforgiven;

swirling tornados of fear and certainty

catching up all in their path;

the burning maelstroms of greed and accumulation,

always hungry for more;

cyclones of despair that build large and wild

to eliminate hope;

the thunderous lightning that deafens, blinds

and denies that which is true and good;

squalls and tempests that accuse and abuse,

causing damage difficult to repair;

and the destructive hurricanes

released by rampant egos

lusting unrelentingly for power.

 

Speak the word, Jesus!

 

© Ken Rookes 2012