Cast your nets with me

Haiku for risk takers

The time is fulfilled
and the kingdom has come near.
Opportunity!

Turn your life around,
put your trust in the good news:
find life, hope and love!

Hear, fisherpeople,
and all who toil and struggle;
your labour bears fruit!

Cast your nets with me,
gather what is true and good.
In the name of love.

The kingdom awaits,
as do all the aching hearts.
Come, travel with me.

Leave your boats and nets.
Bring a heart that is open,
a soul that is true.

Which way will we go,
and where will we sleep at night?
He gives no answer.

He looks upon them,
repeats the invitation:
Come and follow me!

© Ken Rookes 2018.

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I saw you

Haiku of surprising discovery

Hey, comrade Philip,
you’re the man I’m looking for:
come and follow me!

Having met Jesus,
Philip went to find his friend:
Come, meet the teacher!

Could he be the one
the prophets told us about;
the one sent from God?

Nazareth, you say?
How could the Messiah come
from that backwater?

Ah, Nathanael,
I’m very pleased to meet you;
such an honest man!

I’ve never met you,
Jesus, and yet you know me?
Very impressive!

I had a vision.
You sat beneath a fig tree
as Philip approached.

Rabbi, I’m seeing
God’s Son, and Israel’s King.
Teacher, you’re the man!

Give me your answer!
Come, join us on the journey;
you’ll find so much more.

 

© Ken Rookes 2018.

When Jesus calls.

Haiku for taking a chance

With John arrested
Jesus withdraws, goes back home;
north, to Galilee.

He leaves Nazareth
and moves to Capernaum.
There he makes his home.

What the prophet said
is about to be fulfilled;
great light has dawned.

Commencing his work,
he begins to preach. “Repent,
the kingdom comes near.”

Walking by the sea
he sees Andrew and Simon
casting out their nets.

He calls the brothers,
“Come and follow, learn from me;
we’ll fish for people.”

Best offer all day!
The fishers laugh, choose the risk,
leave behind their nets.

Further down the shore
He comes across more brothers,
sons of Zebedee.

In their father’s boat,
Sons of Thunder, James and John,
also get the call.

In a flash, the pair
stop, weigh their options, and leave
dad to mend the nets.

 

© Ken Rookes 2017

Ready to go

Jesus often walked
the western shore of Lake Galilee
in the vicinity of Capernaum;
reflecting, praying, listening.
Perhaps he enjoyed the lapping of the waves,
the cool of the water on dusty feet,
the sounds, the beauty,
and the relative stillness
of the natural world.

He would have observed industry, too;
men with boats and nets,
and women, unnamed and forgotten,
helping to sort the fish
and effect repairs.

When Jesus made his lakeside invitation
to the brothers, Andrew and Simon,
James and John, suggesting
that soon they would be fishing for people;
was he meeting them for the first time?
Mark’s story does not say so;
but it is sometimes read that way.
More likely it was the culmination
of multiple encounters, conversations,
questions, debates, laughter and speculations;
so that when Jesus was ready to go,
so were these friends.

© Ken Rookes 2015