Paying the rent

Paying the rent
Haiku for paying one’s dues

It was occupied
by disrespectful tenants;
the famous vineyard.

Watchtower, wine press
and fenced on every side,
what more could you want?

Think of all the grapes!
The profits must be immense;
go and get the rent!

The wicked tenants
refuse to pay, beating up
those sent to collect.

The story is told
against the privileged ones
who will not bear fruit.

Hand over the rent,
bring forth the righteous bunches
of justice and love.

The angry owner
comes as judge to sort things out,
showing no mercy.

Those on the outside,
sinners and tax collectors,
will be given their place.

The rejected block
has been made the cornerstone.
That is what God does.

 

© Ken Rookes 2020

Some more haiku for the Narrative lectionary, 3rd Sunday in Lent.

How good is this, God? or The best form of welfare. (re-post)

Haiku for the relevant Minister.

Those who are righteous
can treat others with contempt,
Jesus warned, beware!

The tax collector,
lowly, the Pharisee, grand,
stood in the temple.

The Pharisee prayed
proud, God it’s good to be me,
I thank you for that.

I’m such a fine bloke,
honest, blameless, quite unlike
that dole collector.

The tax collector
bowed his head, God, have mercy
on me, a sinner!

The second went home
justified, his prayer answered.
Not the Pharisee.

They are in control,
still, the Pharisees, with their
contempt for the poor.

How good is this, God,
that we are not drug users
and welfare cheaters?

 

© Ken Rookes 2019

Justice and Faith

Haiku for grabbing hold

Another story
from the story-telling man;
and more surprises.

The judge didn’t care
about the law, or people,
or what God wanted.

The judge was corrupt;
if you had enough money
you’d get your verdict.

She is a widow,
pestering, seeking justice;
the judge refuses.

She doesn’t give up,
keeps on with her bothering.
until he gives in.

She achieved justice,
grabbed it tight, not letting go.
God is easier.

Belonging to God,
day and night they are crying
for help, and it comes!

Justice is God’s work.
God’s people can be assured
it will be granted.

Justice and faith,
these two, beloved of God,
shaping God’s people.

 

© Ken Rookes 2019

How good is this, God? or The best form of welfare.

Haiku for the relevant Minister.

Those who are righteous
can treat others with contempt,
Jesus warned, beware!

The tax collector,
lowly, the Pharisee, grand,
stood in the temple.

The Pharisee prayed
proud, God it’s good to be me,
I thank you for that.

I’m such a fine bloke,
honest, blameless, quite unlike
that dole collector.

The tax collector
bowed his head, God, have mercy
on me, a sinner!

The second went home
justified, his prayer answered.
Not the Pharisee.

They are in control,
still, the Pharisees, with their
contempt for the poor.

How good is this, God,
that we are not drug users
and welfare cheaters?

 

© Ken Rookes 2019

A word of context. These haiku relate to the RCL gospel reading for the 27th October, but seem to have a current relevance to some political rubbish here in Australia. I will re-post ahead of the 27th.

The size of a mustard seed

Haiku for the faithful

Increase our faith, Lord,
the apostles requested.
A silly question.

What’s the point of faith,
however big or tiny
unless it is used.

You don’t need much faith,
a mustard seed will suffice.
Just put it to use.

Even a schoolgirl
can make a real difference;
faith joined with courage.

Do not reward us
for doing what’s expected.
We do what we must.

We are worthless slaves.
We owe God everything;
thanks are not required.

What to do with faith?
Love, forgive, build justice, peace;
welcome the kingdom.

Look deeply within;
see the faith already there,
ready to wake up.

 

© Ken Rookes 2019

The gap

Haiku for the indifferent

It’s always been big,
the gap between rich and poor.
Keeps getting larger.

The wealthy man’s scraps
could have fed the poor beggar.
They weren’t on offer.

For a peaceful life
the rich invest in awnings
that conceal the poor.

Beggars confront us,
we hide behind the question:
Are they deserving?

God does not question,
embracing the poor beggar,
deserving or not.

The wealthy protest,
if only we’d realised!
You chose not to know.

Should someone return
from the dead to give warning,
they still would not hear.

 

© Ken Rookes 2019

Not strong enough to dig

Haiku for those who are caught.

The man was corrupt
in charge of his master’s wealth;
finally caught out.

He is in trouble,
knows that he faces charges;
what is he to do?

To ashamed to beg
and not strong enough to dig;
what a dilemma!

He’s not finished yet!
Uses what’s left of his job
to curry favour.

When he’s unemployed
he intends to be welcomed
into wealthy homes.

Cunning like a fox;
summons his master’s debtors
and discounts their debts.

The master gets wind,
laughs at the outrageousness
of his steward’s scheme.

Make friends for yourself
by means of dishonest wealth.
Strange words from Jesus.

Disturbing advice
for those who follow the light;
Should we be more shrewd?

 

© Ken Rookes 2019