Show us the Father

Haiku for the family

Jesus is the way,
the gospel promises us,
to abundant life.

An image of home;
his house with its many rooms.
There we are welcomed.

He spoke. Be at peace;
don’t let your hearts be troubled.
Your place is with me.

Live with faith, he said.
rust in my words; they are true.
Find yourself in God.

Show us the Father,
then we will be satisfied.
Look at me, he said.

There’s work to be done,
God’s work, mine; they are the same.
You will do it too.

This, then, is glory:
together doing the work
God gives to us all.

 

© Ken Rookes 2017

Matthew’s Beatitudes

Haiku for malcontents.

The poor in spirit,
Matthew tells us, will be blessed;
God will be their king.

Those who weep and mourn
will receive divine comfort;
they will know God’s peace.

Fairly straight-forward,
so far, these beatitudes.
Most reassuring.

The meek, we are told
will inherit the earth. But
it’s hard to see how.

Those who are hungry
for righteousness and justice
will be filled. One day.

But if they dare act
against our wealth and power,
we will deal with them.

Those who show mercy
will be labelled ‘bleeding hearts.’
(I made that one up.)

Those who have pure hearts
will see God. We will dismiss
them, call them naive.

The makers of peace
are God’s children. They refuse
to abandon hope.

Their task is thankless.
Dismissed as fools, both their tears
and their smiles persist.

Blessed are the ones
who suffer for goodness’ sake;
God will embrace them.

They may, however,
receive no justice on earth.
should they be content?

What’s a blessing worth?
Whether real or imagined,
can it compensate?

 

© Ken Rookes 2017

Haiku for the sixth of August (and one for the ninth)

Haiku for the sixth of August:

On Hiroshima
the fiery cloud descended,
burning day to night.

 

And one for the ninth:

As if the first one
brought insufficient sorrow;
Nagasaki, too.

 

© Ken Rookes 2015

I posted these for Hiroshima Day 2015, and thought I’d repost them for this year.

See, I am sending you.

A cluster of haiku.

As lambs among wolves,
so, my friends, I send you out:
bearers of good news.

Pronounce God’s shalom.
The blessing will find a home
in children of peace.

As they welcome you
those people, too, will be blessed;
God’s reign coming near.

Not all will listen,
some will not see the kingdom.
Still, it has come near.

 

© Ken Rookes 2016

Peace I leave with you

It doesn’t seem to have been very effective,
that Johanine blessing of peace
upon the lips of Jesus.
Wars, crusades and other violences
have never been in short supply
throughout the years of Christendom.
And so we internalised peace;
pointing to the interior serenity
of those who have come
to worship the Christ.

Self-satisfied peace is not worthy
of disciples.It seems a sad substitute
for an end to brutality, violence and bitterness,
not to mention suffering, abuse, hatred
and fear-engendering politics.
Look around,
see for yourself.

“My peace I give to you,”
the Nazarene is reported as saying.
Are these words for real?
It we take them seriously,
we might need to accept our discipleship calling
to become makers of peace;
we might need to actually do something.
Something to give peace substance,
to clothe it in reconciling flesh and blood,
like the one who came to be its prince.
Something that helps end the fear
and begins to make peace happen.

 

© Ken Rookes 2016

Anzac Day

Day of shining medals.
With each marching step
they
clink solemnly the nation’s gratitude
upon proud chests.

There are medals for peace-keepers, too.
Rightly so;
but only a few for peace-makers.

The peace-makers press on determinedly,
undaunted,
undecorated
and
undisturbed.

 

© Ken Rookes 2016